leek

Chicken soup

Nice and warm!

It’s amazing to discover that this recipe has an entry on Wikipedia!

Now, let’s focus on it. In Italy we would made this with pasta, previously boiled in salty water and then drained, but in this case I will only focus on the soup, so feel free to add any pasta/noodles/rice you prefer.

Tip: if you are planning to accompany the soup with pasta, you can store the drained pasta directly in box separate from the soup, so it will not absorb the broth.

I am always in trouble to suggest a clear indication for servings related to soup, it really depends on how much you like it, or how many pieces of meat you are going to put in it. I tend to put more veggies in it, I like some consistency in the broth but not so meaty; this soup is actually excellent if you have some leftover from your farmer’s market, or the veggies you have are not enough to do something else.
The choice is yours.

Cooking time:
2 hours totally, ½ hour for cutting veggies, 1,5 for boiling the soup

Ingredients for 4/5 servings:
½ chicken, or 500 gr of chicken thighs
1,5 onions
2 leeks
6 chestnut mushrooms (or any other)
3 carrots
2 celery stalks
3 potatoes
2 glasses of passata di pomodoro (I cannot be bothered in writing all the time sieved uncooked tomatoes, seriously!)
1 bay leaf
black pepper
1 tsp. Aji-no-moto
0,5 tsp. salt

Preparation:
Wash and cut all your vegetables first, it will take a while but you will be rewarded! 😀 The size of the pieces is according to your taste, I really enjoy small pieces, though it takes longer to cut them; plus, bigger pieces give the same results. Use a large pot to put all the ingredients together with the chicken, skin and all. Generously season with black pepper; for the salt I tend to use less sodium in my recipe, which is why I use MSG for my meat soups.

Tip: you may eliminate salt completely and serve the soup with some grated parmesan on top.

Fill the pot with water and let it boil at low fire covered by the lid for 1,5 hours. If you don’t know how much water you need, an empirical eyeball measure will do: fill the pot with water till all the ingredients are covered, and then add another third of water. This will secure that the soup can cook on its own for the entire time.

Buon appetito!

 


(Credits: Hoyabird8 at English Wikipedia)


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